Bookish Games Leaderboard

I play games during every interview here at All By My Shelf. And I’ve recently devised a points system. Check below to see where your favorite author ranks.

Connect with me: Facebook . Twitter . Instagram Visit ABMS.BLOG Join The Writers’ Society Become a Member and Get Access to More (or follow me for free but get less) RedBubble Bookshop.org Find ABMS on Podbean Let's talk about objects and how they can enhance your writing! Creating objects can help bring your characters off the page and help to create stories for them. Look at the objects you have nearby. You probably have at least one of the following: a family heirloom photos of family, friends, holidays, festivals, and vacations posters and or other images hanging on your walls special clothes for special occasions books ornaments everyday useful things like mugs or silverware Every item has a history-including that plastic fork you have yet to throw out. They help paint a story of their surroundings. Wherever you can create an object in your writing, you build the world out a little more. Here's a few ways to use objects in literature: as a plot device: sometimes the plot can revolve around finding or destroying an object (see Lord of the Rings) to represent a character: sometimes, personal items say more about the character than the character's actions. Think of the wands in Harry Potter and how crooked Bellatrix's is. as a symbol representing something larger than itself: for this the most famous example I could think of is the green light in The Great Gatsby, and how it represents Gatsby's hopes, dreams, and his connection to Daisy. as a clue: maybe you're writing a mystery or detective fiction. Objects can be used to reveal all sorts of significant things. Channel your inner Sherlock and consider how people use objects every day to really drive this home. to foreshadow something: sometimes a gun hanging on the wall will come up later. to trigger a memory or flashback: sometimes things just look too familiar and they spark something within us. as a device connecting characters' separate stories: maybe your object, magical or otherwise, has been around for significant moments in history, sitting in the corner and lifelessly observing things as life happens around it. Objects are useful because characters can find them, lose them, receive them, gift them, steal or have them stolen, search for them, treasure them, neglect them, lock them up, and even destroy them or toss them aside. And the symbolism of their actions can add to your story. Now for the exercise: Pick an object in your home that has some meaning for you. Study it for a moment and describe it in as much detail as you can. Now construct a scene around it. Was the object stolen or found? Was it a gift? Was it inherited? Make sure the object triggers a significant event for your character (or you, if you're writing about yourself). Let the object help them make a decision, understand something that happened, or turn their life in a different direction.
  1. Objects
  2. Fairy Tales
  3. Mind Mapping
  4. An Interview with Carly Heath
  5. Twisting Your Genre

This player shows the most recent public episodes of the All By My Shelf Podcast.

Never Have I Ever Spoiled My Own Book

Guests are given a series of tropes based on their upcoming or recently published work as well as stereotypical writerly things to do (EXAMPLE: Never have I ever written at a coffee shop, Never have I ever written a smoking gun, etc). If they have done more than half of the scenarios, they have to spoil something from their book.

*Marked scores indicate interviews with spoilers.

AuthorBookDateScore
Michelle Mason (interview)Your Life Has Been Delayed8/30/215/10*
Hayley Krischer (interview)The Falling Girls10/15/216/10*
Soman Chainani (interview)Beasts & Beauty: Dangerous Tales9/18/216/10*
Jessica Vitalis (interview)The Wolf’s Curse9/10/216/10*
Carly Heath (interview)The Reckless Kind2/5/227/10*
Brandie June (interview)Gold Spun6/26/218/10*

Name That Book

Guests are given the tagline or a brief description of a book on the NYT Bestsellers list. They get a bonus point if they can also name the author.

AuthorBookDateScore
Jessica Speer (interview)BFF or NRF8/16/20211

The Book Stops Here

Guests are given a book title and they have to guess how many pages have been published without going over. They must be within 50 pages of the total to get points. If they go over they lose points, if they are way under they are safe.

AuthorBookDateScore
Michelle Mason (interiew)Your Life Has Been Delayed8/30/213/10

In this game, I give the author three rounds of three books. They must choose one to hoard so that others can never see it, one to sacrifice, so they can steal its power and become a better writer, and one to giveaway never to see again (hypothetically, of course).

AuthorBookDateBooks Added to the Giveaway Jar
Halli Gomez (interview)List of Ten1/22/2022The Visitors by Greg Howard, Serafina and the Black Cloak by Robert Beatty, Jay’s Gay Agenda by Jason June
Lisa Frenkel Riddiough (interview)Elvis and the World As It Stands10/23/2021The Struggle Bus by Julie Koon, 365 Days to Alaska by Cathy Carr, Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro, Glitter Gets Everywhere by Yvette Clark, Normal People by Sally Rooney
Brandie June (interview) Gold Spun 6/26/2021 A Touch of Darkness by Scarlett St. Clair, Two Kingdoms by Kristy Cunning, Hazel and Gray by Nic Stone

MAD Blurbs

My guests are given a brief blurb about their favorite books, but I have taken out key information and replaced it with [noun], [adjective], [character], and [verb].

MADblurbs

AuthorBookDateScore
Lisa RIddiough (interview)Elvis and The World as it Stands10/22/20216
Halli Gomez (interview)List of Ten1/22/20225
Soman Chainani (interview)Beasts & Beauty: Dangerous Tales9/18/20213
Jessica Speer (interview)BFF or NRF8/16/20213
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Published by J. M. Tuckerman

J.M.Tuckerman is a neurodivergent writer with a big education. She holds an MFA in Writing for Children and Young Adults, an MA in Writing, and a BA in Writing Arts (specializing in Creative Writing, New Media Writing, and Publication; concentrating in New Media Production), which she somehow managed to earn despite her three very loud and large dogs. Jessica was lucky enough to intern at Quirk Books and Picador, USA while earning her master’s degrees. Her service dog, Ringo, is very proud of all that she has accomplished and hopes to be on a back cover of a published book with her very soon. An avid reader, writer, and lover of young adult and middle-grade literature, Jessica’s bookshelf is overflowing with hardbacks, paperbacks, and a million half-filled notebooks. She is a proud fur-mommy to two lab/st-bernard littermates, a retriever-mix service dog, and one orange little hobgoblin cat, all of whom have made very audible appearances on the Booked All Night podcast.

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